Into the Unknown

20161025_170900“When I began my journey…I did not have a fully mapped career path in my mind. I always told myself that I had time to figure it out and then in the blink of an eye, I found myself in the fourth year of my undergraduate degree.”

Written by: Crystal Lobo
Political Science Level IV

When I began my journey in Political Science, I did not have a fully mapped career path in my mind. I always told myself that I had time to figure it out and then in the blink of an eye, I found myself in the fourth year of my undergraduate degree. Like many of my peers, the tensions of the future got to me at the beginning of this academic year. I decided attended the Careers in Business Panel hosted by the Experiential Education office to see how my education could help me be successful in the job market.

The panel occurred on October 25, 2016. It consisted of three professionals who prided themselves on being McMaster Social Sciences alumni. The three panelists were from fields of consulting, human resources and corporate affairs, and policy and research analysis. Each of the panelists gave us students a description of their background, their education, and how they used lessons from the Social Sciences to carve their paths into fruitful and worthwhile careers in the business industry. Students then got the opportunity to ask panelists specific questions. Subjects of these inquiries included the value of an graduate-level degree, the transferability of skills obtained in the Social Sciences to careers in business, interview advice, and gender inequality in the industry, among many other topics. The panelists provided students answers bearing sources from their experiences and what they had seen over the years.

I learned two valuable lessons from attending the panel. First, I learned not to sell my Social Sciences degree short. The panelists helped me realize that this discipline effectively enhances skills in communication, innovation, and leadership. These skills not only impress employers but also craft successful careers in the business sector. Second, I learned the value of assessing our reasoning when making career decisions. For example, one of the panelists told us his reasoning against pursuing a graduate-level degree based on assessing that it would not specifically enhance his career growth or income in his role, but in other instances it might.  I may not pursue a career in business, but I still found this panel to be valuable because it made me open my mind to all the various opportunities my #SocSci degree will give me when I graduate.

Ambitious Student. Ambitious City.

By Cam Galindo
(Political Science)

Every so often, students at McMaster University are offered the opportunity to experience something new and go beyond the books. Last month, I did just that. Through my Experiential Education (EE) office in the Faculty of Social Sciences, I was made aware of an event that was being hosted by the Hamilton Chamber of Commerce called Ambitious City 2015, Is Hamilton Canada’s Brooklyn? The cost of attending the event was covered by an experiential grant, called the Hamilton Matters Fund, offered through the EE office. I’ve always been one to experience as much as possible so I accepted the offer and attended the event with a friend.

AC3 AC2

The event was more of a spirited panel conversation between experts on the movement fuelling Hamilton’s fresh identity and new economy. The discussion ended up being moderated by none other than Steve Paikin, host of TVO’s the Agenda, and someone whom I look up to as a Political Science student. Also in attendance was the President and CEO of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, Carlo Scissura, and a few local notables.

Continue reading